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Walden University Writing Center

Where instructors and editors talk writing.

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Writing Refresh: In-text versus Parenthetical Citations

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Today let’s go over some resources for in-text versus parenthetical citations. Although both important, in-text and parenthetical citations aren’t fully interchangeable. Sometimes just sticking that parenthetical citation at the end of a sentence can be confusing and unclear to your reader. Read on for this writing refresher to achieve clear citations and review some of our great resources to assist you with citation formatting! 
Image of glass with lime and straw with Writing Refresh written over it


Sometimes a parenthetical citation (read more about parenthetical citations here) might look like this:

This educational plan will enhance the nurses’ patient care and ability to communicate more effectively with patients (Helakoski, 2016).

After implementing these changes, Woodward Elementary can engage ELL students more effectively (Helakoski, 2016).

So what’s the problem?  Helakoski didn’t specifically write about the writer’s educational plan for a specific hospital’s group of nurses, right? Or about Woodward Elementary and its ELL students. What’s more likely in both of these cases is that Helakoski’s ideas influenced the specific plans the student has made or changes they’d like to implement—but the reader can’t tell that from the citation.

So how do we fix this? Simple! Switch to an in-text citation for clarity (read more about the trouble with these citations and more examples and solutions here).

This educational plan will enhance the nurses’ patient care and ability to communicate more effectively with patients as described by Helakoski (2016).

After implementing these changes, Woodward Elementary can engage ELL students more effectively, similar to Helakoski’s (2016) study.

And there are lots of options!

Using Helakoski’s (2016) methods, this education plan will enhance…

After implementing these changes, modeled after Helakoski’s (2016) intervention, …
For more about when to cite in the sentence versus in parentheses, check out these additional resources!
So next time you cite an author concerning a method or idea specific to your paper’s topic, be sure to make it clear to the reader where the line is by citing in-text rather than in parentheses



The Walden Writing Center provides information and assistance to students with services like live chat, webinars, course visits, paper reviews, podcasts, modules, and the writing center webpages. Through these services they provide students assistance with APA, scholarly writing, and help students gain skills and confidence to enhance their scholarly work.


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Break the Block: The Ticking Clock

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We’ve all been there. You’re working on a paper, but you’re struggling to put words on the page. Perhaps you have a looming deadline; perhaps, instead of writing, you’ve spent 45 minutes catching up on Twitter and watching cat videos; perhaps you know exactly what you want to have written—if you close your eyes, you can see the finished paper, full of unassailable logic and scintillating insight—but cannot seem to actually write it. You are not alone.


The wall crumbling as you Break the Block

Many people, including many very successful writers, struggle to write despite their best intentions. They’ve taken the right steps: they’ve set aside time for writing, they’ve collected their ideas in a notebook, and they’ve developed a plan for their text. When they attempt to write, though, something interrupts them. We usually call this Writer’s Block as if it were a diagnosis with a clear, single cause, but it’s really more like a syndrome, a set of behaviors with murky, and possibly multiple, origins.

For some people, it’s pure distraction. For others the cause is anxiety: negative experiences have conditioned them to mentally and physically react to the work of writing as if it were a hungry tiger, its glowing eyes assessing the meat potential of their bodies. Others lack confidence, which makes them discount the value of their writing. After all, because writing rarely leads to tangible short-term benefits, it can seem to produce no benefit at all (even though we all know this isn’t true), so you might find yourself focusing instead on tasks that yield immediate results, like clearing out your inbox or running errands. Whatever the cause of your block, though, the result is the same: you’re not getting your writing done. Thankfully, there’s a simple technique that can help you get past your block.

The ticking clock is a well-worn device used in fiction, and you’re already familiar with it if you’ve seen a few action movies. The hero races to crack the code, defuse the bomb, rescue the hostage, find the bad guy, or otherwise save the world before time runs out—that’s the ticking clock. It heightens the drama because it places a time limit on the task at hand. It must be accomplished now, not in some hazy future, or else catastrophe will ensue. Nothing else is more important when the clock is ticking down. In a less dramatic (and, admittedly, less clich├ęd) way, you can use a ticking clock to similarly focus your writing practice, reminding you that your time is limited and that this portion of it, right now, is dedicated to a vital task.

You can use the ticking clock in several ways (see our website for a good introductory approach), but they all share these steps:

1.) Start by setting an intention for your writing. It could be a specific task (“revise my problem statement”), it could be more general (“begin a rough draft of the paper I need to turn in this weekend”), or it could be to diminish your fear of the blank page (“write something, anything, for five minutes without stopping”).

2.) Next, set an achievable time goal. When you’re developing a good habit, it’s better to set a goal that you can usually achieve (and, on a good day, exceed) than one you’re unlikely to meet most of the time. For example, rather than committing to writing for 90 minutes every day, which is probably unrealistic if you also need to work full-time and see your loved ones, you might instead choose 15 minutes five days per week. The key is that this is a minimum: if you reach your 15-minute goal, you’ll likely want to—and should—keep writing for as long as you can.

3.)Then, you’ll set a timer for your time goal. I use the timer on my phone, but anything with an alarm will work—an egg timer, an alarm clock, the timer built into your microwave, etc.

4.) Finally, start the timer and write. Don’t stop until the timer is done. You don’t have to write quickly, but avoid interrupting your train of thought. Remind yourself, if you feel your attention being pulled away, that this time is for writing and nothing else. (It might help to close your Internet browser or set your phone to Do Not Disturb to minimize potential distractions.)

When the time runs out, you’ll have some new text to work with, and, more importantly, you’ll have made progress despite your block.



Matt Sharkey-Smith is a writing instructor and the coordinator of research and pedagogy in the Walden Writing Center. He also serves as contributing faculty in the Walden Academic Skills Center.  Matt joined the Writing Center in 2010 with a BA in English from Saint John's University in Minnesota. He earned an MFA in Writing from Hamline University in St. Paul in 2011 and has worked outside of Walden as a technical writer, fact-checker, copy editor, tutor, and writing instructor. 


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Break the Block: A Three-Strategy Series on Writer's Block

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Even if you do your best to set aside time to write, do all your reading, take notes, and work on outlining, you might still find yourself staring at a blank screen when it comes time to write. Break The Block is a three-part series that will help you break free of writer’s block and achieve your writing goals!


Beat the Block Wall Smash Image


In this series we discuss how to find a good space to write, turn off your inner critic, and set aside productive time. Our staff members provide some context, strategies, and personal anecdotes to help you break free from writer’s block and be your most productive writing self.

Sound interesting? Check out each of our posts below!

Find a Suitable Environment—Instructor Veronica discusses the importance of finding your writing space and strategies for figuring out what works best for you in spaces you can control as well as spaces you can’t.
Turn Off Your Internal Editor—Instructor Michael discusses the importance of writing without critiquing yourself too harshly to get your flow going and know that you’ll be able to refine later in the process.
The Ticking Clock—Instructor Matt discusses ways to carve out that time to write, even with a busy schedule as well as fighting the anxiety that can come from experiencing writer’s block during that time.

With some help from these three posts, you can conquer writer’s block and complete your work on time and effectively. Have some writer’s block breaking tips you’d like to share or comments on which of these posts worked best for you? Share below!



The Walden Writing Center provides information and assistance to students with services like live chat, webinars, course visits, paper reviews, podcasts, modules, and the writing center webpages. Through these services they provide students assistance with APA, scholarly writing, and help students gain skills and confidence to enhance their scholarly work.

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Break the Block: Turn Off Your Internal Editor

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When considering how to get over writer’s block, the mind immediately turns to combating this paralyzing anxiety that many people feel when asked to write. This anxiety, in fact, is synonymous with writer’s block. To a large degree, this anxiety can be attributed to a tension between the ideas in one’s head and the difficulty of representing those ideas in the same way.  Unlike speech, where one unconsciously adds emphasis, pause, syntax, diction, etc. writing involves conscious choices. “How do I want to put this?” an author may ask. Here, an internal editor takes over to craft your thoughts into written words and represent those ideas accurately to your reader.

At times though, this editor can get out of control. This editor can get in the way. One can get caught up in thinking of how a sentence should be organized, punctuated, and crafted. Here is where writer’s block rears it sinister face. It is important to limit the input of the internal editor in order to overcome the anxiety that causes writer’s block.

Break the Block: Smash through the wall of writer's block


The first way to start to quiet this internal editor is to understand where it comes from. Most people, if not all people, have a teacher in their past that has been a stickler for the rules of grammar. As a writer, this made you take pause. Putting something perfect the first time became the highest test of a strong writer. The emphasis shifted from stating your ideas to making sure that you have commas in the correct places.

At this point you are losing your way and allowing the less important elements of writing to overshadow the more important ones. The overall goal of academic writing is to add one’s voice to the larger scholarly conversation. What you have to say is more important than how you say it. By discarding this internal editor and getting your ideas down on paper, no matter how flawed grammatically, you are favoring your own scholarly thought.  

Once your thoughts are on paper, you can then return to them later and refine them, using your editorial skills to polish your work. Writing is an iterative process. Composing multiple drafts is something that every writer does. Each draft allows you to improve. Before you can do this though, you need to get your ideas out of your mind and into a more tangible form. Though this internal editor can help you when it comes to reworking your writing, first one needs to get those ideas onto paper.

So, the next time you are caught in a deep writer’s block, and the voice in your head is reminding you that you may not know how to perfectly punctuate a complex sentence with a piece of introductory information, tell that voice to “shut up.” Understand that, though important, mechanical concerns of writing are not as important as the ideas being expressed. Give yourself permission to write imperfectly. Then, endeavor to return to your work and revise it until it both expresses your ideas accurately and satisfies the grammar stickler in your mind. Quieting your internal editor can provide the freedom necessary to break writer’s block and be an effective communicator. 

Do you have any strategies that help you Break the Block? If so, let us know in the comments section below!

For more strategies on how to Break the Block, check out Veronica's post from last week. 
And please join us next week when we'll have the final post in our Break the Block series with a brand new strategy for you to use to overcome your writer's block issues.


Michael Dusek
 is a writing instructor in the Walden University Writing Center. He has taught writing at universities in both Minnesota and Wisconsin, and enjoys helping students improve their writing. To Michael, the essay is both expressive and formal, and is a method for creative problem solving. In his personal life, he enjoys the outdoors, books, music, and all other types of art. 


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WriteCast Episode 35: A Brief Daily Session Walk-Through - Mindful Writing, Part 2

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The latest episode of the Walden University Writing Center's Podcast, WriteCast: A Casual Conversation for Serious Writers, is live. In this month's episode Jes and Max are back to lead a brief daily session in a follow-up to last month's episode about mindful writing.

For this exercise, find a writing project and a timer, and follow along through the four steps: prepare, write, pause, reflect. To get the most out of this brief daily session, we suggest first listening to WriteCast episode 34, "Taking Care of Yourself With Mindful Writing." Below, listen to A Brief Daily Session Walk-Through--Mindful Writing (Episode 35).



Here's an overview of Episode 34 along with a link to that episode if you missed it last month!

Taking Care of Yourself With Mindful Writing (Episode 34)
How can we apply qualities of mindfulness—such as acceptance, compassion, body awareness, and being present in the moment—to our academic writing? To kick off the new year, Brittany and Beth talk with writing instructors Max and Jes Philbrook about how using mindful writing improved their dissertation experience and how students can get started creating a sustainable, mindful writing practice.




For a list of all of our WriteCast episodes, visit the Writing Center website for Interactive and Multimedia writing resources. Here, you can also access download information and transcripts for each of our podcast episodes. Happy Listening, WriteCasters!


The WriteCast Podcast  is produced by the staff of the Walden University Writing Center and delves into a different writing issue in each episode. In line with the mission of the Writing Center, WriteCast provides multi-modal, on demand writing instruction that enhances students' writing skill and ease. We hope you enjoy this episode and comment in the box below.


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